How Do You Know When Your Rear Brakes Need Replacing?

The brake drums on your car are built to last for about 200,000 miles. In some cases, the drums will wear out sooner due to worn out internal components that put more strain on the drum. As your brake drums begin to wear down, they will actually become smaller.

How many miles should brakes last?

As a general rule of thumb, there’s about a 40,000 mile range in play. Average brake pad life is somewhere around 25,000 to 65,000 miles. However, many people have heard of brake pads lasting more than 70,000 miles, even beyond the 80,000 mile threshold. You may have even experienced super-long brake pad wear yourself.

How do I know if my brake shoes are worn out?

Shoes with worn or contaminated friction material can make a squeaking or squealing noise. If the friction material is worn away, you might instead hear a grinding sound as the metal backing plate rubs against the drum. Low brake pedal: Worn shoe linings can result in a brake pedal that’s lower than normal.

How often do rear brakes need to be replaced?

Brake pads wear out as part of their normal operation. Rear brake pads only perform about 25 percent of the braking effort. As such, rear pads are smaller than front pads. With that in mind, you can expect to replace the rear brake pads once for every two to three times you replace the front pads.

How much does a brake change cost?

The average brake pad replacement cost is $150 per axle, and can range from $100 per axle up to $300 per axle. There are a few other pieces of hardware that are found in the brake system which might need to be serviced as well, including calipers and rotors, but the most common service will be to replace brake pads.

How fast do rear brake pads wear?

This means the rear brakes will often wear out before the front brakes. In vehicles with a conventional proportioning valve, the front brakes typically wear two to three times faster than the pads or shoes in the rear.

What happens when brake shoes wear out?

If the brake shoes become excessively worn or overheated, their capacity to slow the vehicle may be reduced. This may result in a vehicle that takes longer to stop when the brakes are applied, especially during high speed or heavy braking situations.